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Which Nutrient Helps your Prostate to Shrink Faster?

What is the prostate?

Today’s article is going to be interesting. We’ll be looking at the prostate and the best nutrient to maintain the health of the prostate.

Let’s begin by looking at the prostate gland and what it is.

Many people tend to be confused about the function of the prostate gland. Very few people know what the prostate gland does. Most people know that the prostate enlarges as a person gets older and blocks urination.

The prostate gland is the size of a walnut and is located between the penis and the bladder and just in front of the rectum. The urethra runs through the center of the prostate, from the bladder to the penis, and then allows urine to flow out of the body.

Your prostate gland is saddled with the responsibility of secreting the fluid that protects and nourishes the sperm. When you are about to ejaculate, the prostate will squeeze this fluid into your urethra, which will flow out with the sperm as semen.

Photo by sakurra


What does the prostate do?

Here’s the thing — a functioning prostate is not required to live, but it is essential for fertility.


1. It helps in semen production

The primary function is the provision of prostatic fluid to the semen. At least 20–30 percent of the semen volume is contributed by the prostate. In addition, 5 percent of the semen volume comes from the testicles, while 50–65 percent comes from the seminal vesicles

Prostatic fluid is enriched with essential components that make the semen habitable for sperm cells. These components include citric acid, zinc, and enzymes. For example, a vital enzyme for the prostatic fluid is prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which thins the semen and makes it more fluid.

The same fluid helps the sperm to move in the urethra. It also protects the sperm while it is swimming toward an egg.

Prostatic fluid has a slightly acidic PH. However, other components of the semen increase its PH making it more alkaline. The essence is to counteract the acidic PH of the vagina and protect the sperm.

Photo By Judith


2. The prostate closes the urethra during ejaculation

When ejaculating, the prostate contracts and releases prostatic fluid into the urethra. The prostatic fluid mixes with sperm fluid and cells. The fluid comes from the seminal vesicles into the urethra, where it mixes with sperm cells to form semen. The body then expels this semen.

Contraction of the prostate during ejaculation closes the space between the urethra and the bladder, causing the semen to move quickly. This explains why healthy men do not urinate and ejaculate simultaneously.


3. Hormone metabolism

The prostate needs androgens. Androgens are male sex hormones, like testosterone. Without this, the prostate cannot function correctly.

There’s an enzyme in the prostate called 5-alpha reductase. This enzyme converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, the biologically active form of testosterone.

Dihydrotestosterone is involved in the normal development and functioning of the prostate. In addition, dihydrotestosterone is essential for developing facial hair and other secondary sexual characteristics in the developing male.


What’s the connection between zinc and the prostate?

Here’s an important thing to note:

The prostate gland has the highest concentration of zinc. In other words, the prostate has a hundred times more zinc concentration than your blood. So you see, if you test your blood and it is usual with zinc, it might not tell you what is going on inside the prostate gland.


Studies have shown that zinc levels are decreased in men with prostate cancer. In addition, zinc also suppresses the cell growth of prostate cancer. These findings have led to the hypothesis that zinc may play a protective role.

So, technically, there’s a link between zinc deficiency and inflammation in the prostate gland, prostate gland enlargement, and susceptibility to getting prostate cancer. That’s interesting.

Here’s another thing you should note. The human body has a compelling form of testosterone known as dihydrotestosterone. Remember 5-alpha reductase? Well, certain medications inhibit that enzyme from reducing dihydrotestosterone. Now, it is worth mentioning that zinc is an essential inhibitor of 5-alpha reductase. Therefore, it is also important to note that people with low testosterone are usually zinc deficient.

As such, zinc is the most critical trace nutrient, so ensure that your testosterone level is high, ensure that the fertility of sperm is there, and make sure that the size of the prostate is maintained.

Photo By airborne77


What causes a zinc deficiency?

There are many reasons.

First, the affected person may not consume enough red meat. When a person gets older, they are typically advised not to eat meat. But these experts fail to differentiate between pasture-raised meats and processed meats. Instead, they lump it into one big concept and report the elderly not to eat it and other recommendations like lowering your cholesterol foods, which ironically happen to be the building block of testosterone. You’re then advised to eat plant foods, specifically whole grains.

The funny thing is that whole grains are loaded with phytic acid, and that’s the biggest thing that blocks your ability to absorb zinc. So over two billion people are deficient in zinc because they take in plenty of cereal and too many grains.

Now, here’s another important thing about aging:

  • When you get older, the concentration of acids in your stomach reduces. Of course, stomach acid is essential for zinc absorption. If you have low stomach acids, you’ll be unable to absorb zinc.
  • If you’re taking an antacid, you’re deficient in zinc.
  • If you are taking a diuretic, it will deplete you of zinc.
  • Statins also cause significant zinc deficiencies.
  • Alcohol is another common thing that may cause zinc deficiency. High sugar consumption will also cause zinc deficiency.
  • Eating frequent meals like late-night snacking while watching the TV will cause insulin resistance, depleting zinc.

Photo by Tijana Drndarski on Unsplash


Symptoms of zinc deficiency

Zinc production impedes the production of healthy, new cells. This leads to the following symptoms:

  • Open sores on the skin
  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of alertness
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Wounds that refuse to heal
  • Decreased sense of taste and smell

The best food sources of zinc

One of the best sources of zinc is shellfish (oysters). The second-best source is red meat followed by nuts, seeds, eggs, and dairy products.

These foods can be easy and delicious additions to your diet.


Takeaway

Zinc is an essential mineral, and eating enough is important for maintaining good health. Zinc deficiency is widespread in the United States. However, it can be reversed via dietary changes.

People with zinc deficiency can tackle their problem by seeking out healthy zinc sources and watching what they eat. Talk to your healthcare provider about the possibility of taking a supplement.


Disclaimer: Dr. Berner does not diagnose, treat, or prevent any medical diseases or conditions; instead, he analyzes and corrects the structure of his patients with Foundational Correction to improve their overall quality of life. He works with their physicians, who regulate their medications. This blog post is not designed to provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment, or services to you or any other individual. The information provided in this post or through linkages to other sites is not a substitute for medical or professional care. You should not use the information in place of a visit, consultation, or the advice of your physician or another healthcare provider. Foundation Chiropractic and Dr. Brett Berner are not liable or responsible for any advice, the course of treatment, diagnosis, or any other information, services, or product you obtain through this article or others.

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